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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Stop Paint Build-Up

Posted by on Jan 27, 2015 in Blog, Quick Tip Tuesday | 5 comments

We all know painting can be messy. Unless you have some sort of “magic pouring system” {and if you do…pleeeease share! :) } the paint always seems to collect in the rim.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve splashed myself with paint while sealing the lid back on. I’ve learned to place an old rag over the top while hammering. This way, the paint splash stays on the rag. However, this solution doesn’t help me when I open that same can, and there’s a ton of crusty dry paint stuck in the rim.

Paint build-up that dries hard and crusty in the rim can easily mess up a finish when it gets mixed into your fresh paint!

Jennifer from Trillium Park Designs has shared this wonderfully simple paint drip tip with us today!

 

TrilliamParkDesign-StopPaintBuildUp-2

 

Next time you open a new paint can, drive seven or eight nail holes into the recessed rim of your paint can.

The paint that accumulates in the rim will “drain” back into the can. This will reduce the chances of that nasty splatter when you go to hammer the lid back on and help reduce the chance of dealing with dried crusty paint for the next time!

 

So smart and simple and I can’t believe I didn’t think of this. I’m all for any tip that helps keep my mess to a minimum! Thanks Jennifer!

Have any questions on reducing drips or storing paint? Or maybe you have your own tips on how to paint cleaner and smarter? Chime in because I always love hearing from you! 

You can catch last weeks Q-T-T here and if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, feel free to send me an email.

Now lets get painting!

Denise x

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How To Distress Furniture with Beeswax

How To Distress Furniture with Beeswax

Posted by on Jan 23, 2015 in Blog, Distressing Furniture, How To Tips, Milk Paint | 4 comments

Hi everyone!

A few weeks back I distressed a charming milk painted desk using Vaseline. I had fun with this distressing technique and wondered why it took me so long to give it a try? It saved me from distress sanding, (softened my hands)… and the desk turned out adorable and sold super fast!

After reading the Vaseline post, a lot of you chimed in asking if I had ever used beeswax or similar wax repelling products to distress my furniture. Then, more of you chimed in saying you had distressed with wax and it works beautifully. This convinced me to give wax a try.

Plus I have to admit, I really like the idea of  minimal sanding =  time saved = less work!

After falling in love with Miss Mustard Seed’s Typewriter Black {the base coat on the Vaseline Distressed Desk} I had to use this black on an entire piece. I wanted this desk to be transformed from ’70’s Old-School’ to ‘Antiqued-Old-World’. Distressing the paint and allowing the wood to peek through would do just that.

Before I get into how the beeswax works, here’s the before and after.

B&A Wax Distressed Desk

 

Gorgeous right!!!?  MMS Typewriter Black Milk Paint is definitely my new “go-to black” when creating a dark moody vintage/antique piece. Also, these are the pulls that were featured on this weeks Q-T-T!

 

Here’s what I used~

:: Miss Mustard Seed’s Typewriter Black mixed with Bonding Agent (1st coat only)

:: A Cheap Dollar Store Paint Brush

:: 100% Beeswax Puck

:: 220 & 400 Grit Sandpaper

:: Custom Dark Wax~Annie Sloan Natural Wax mixed with Black Acrylic Paint

 

And to make things even easier, I already had 100% Beeswax from my Ukrainian Easter Egg Decorating days. These beeswax pucks have been in storage for more years than I care to admit. They’re not old and moldy… just old.

If you’re interested in a little beeswax trivia, you can tell these pucks are high quality 100% beeswax because of the ‘bloom’ that’s formed on them. The bloom is that whitish film which is the natural minerals rising to the surface of the wax over time.

 

Beeswax-and-Milk-Paint

 

To give this desk a natural aged look, I rubbed the puck of wax onto the raised areas of the desk that would normally have worn with time. I have to say, beeswax smells delish! I also rubbed the wax on the drawers and base to give this desk an old-world vintage look.

 

Distressing-Furniture-w-Wax

How-to-Distress-Furniture-w-Wax-LG

Distressing-w-Beeswax

 

Then I mixed the MMS Typwriter black and applied it directly over the wax. I used a cheap dollar store brush so I wouldn’t have to worry about cleaning my good brushes.

The idea behind distressing furniture with vaseline or wax products is kind of like the oil and water theory.

They repel each other and this results in the paint NOT adhering to the areas that the wax has been applied. I thought the wax would repel more than it actually did, but as you can see below, it was quite subtle. I thought I was rubbing on a pretty thick layer, but apparently, I could have layered the wax on even thicker.

 

beeswax-repelling-milk-paint

 

After two coats of milk paint, I sanded the entire desk using 220 grit for distressing and 400 grit for the final finish. Unlike the Vaseline Distressing, the Wax Distressing Method DOES require sanding. I couldn’t have just wiped the paint off easily. The final result is also alot more subtle.

 

Beeswax-Distressed-MMS-Painted-Desk

 

MilkPaint-Distressed-w-Beeswax

 

MilkPaint-Wax-Distressed

 

MMS-Blk-Beeswax-Distressed-Desk-1

 

BlkDesk-Distressed-w-Beeswax

 

This desk is elegant and gorgeous. I will definitely use this wax distressing technique again. Although I still had to sand, it made the sanding effort lighter and therefore less likely to sand past the stained wood.

There are also similar ‘wax’ repelling products sold by Miss Mustard Seed and Annie Sloan. I would like to give these products a try too to see how they compare to the 100% All Natural Beeswax.

 

Here’s my take-a-way~

When I’m looking for a more subtle distressing ~ the wax technique.

When I want a heavier distressed look ~ the Vaseline technique.

 

Have you ever distressed painted furniture using Beeswax? If you have any questions or comments or would just like to say ‘hi’, don’t be shy… I always love to hear your thoughts so feel free to chime in!

Have a great day… and I hope you enjoy your weekend whatever you decide to do!

Denise x

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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Glazing Knobs and Pulls to Customize and Save $$$

Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Glazing Knobs and Pulls to Customize and Save $$$

Posted by on Jan 20, 2015 in Blog, Glazing Furniture, Quick Tip Tuesday | 7 comments

Hi everyone… and Happy Tuesday to you! I hope your week is off to a great start!

For today’s quick-tip, I’ll show you how I’ve been saving $$$ by using ‘off-the-shelf’ knobs and pulls and transforming them into one-of-a-kind jewels simply by applying a glaze.

Lately I’ve been stocking up on discounted furniture hardware. I’ve found some amazing deals at Hobby Lobby {who can beat their 50% off hardware sale?!} Pier 1, Marshall’s (yes Marshall’s!) and any place else that has hardware sale prices.

When I buy knobs and pulls, I look for a pleasing size and shape in a material and style I really like… but it really doesn’t matter what color they are!

Hardware can always be painted or glazed to compliment any salvaged piece.

Here’s a great example.

These pulls are super charming as is…

 

Glazing-Knobs-and-Pulls---Before

 

Glazing-Knobs---Before

 

To take them up a notch and customize them for this desk I’m working on, I glazed them black. I added black paint to Behr Faux Glaze. Brushed on and then wiped off. So simple.

 

Glazing-Knobs-and-Pulls-to-Customize

Glazing-Knobs-1

Glazing-Knobs-2

 

Now that they’re glazed, these pulls are gorgeous. They are unique and one-of-a-kind {rather than off-the-shelf} and they’re perfectly tailored for my painted desk that I’ll be posting for you later this week.

 

Glazing-Knobs-and-Pulls--blk

 

So if you ever come across sale priced knobs and pulls but you’re unsure of the color, grab them anyway! This will save you some $$$ and you can always create gorgeous customized hardware by glazing your knobs and pulls for your painted furniture!

Have any questions on glazing knobs and pulls? Or maybe you have your own secret on how to turn hum-drum knobs into one-of-a-kind jewels? Chime in because I always love hearing from you! :)

You can catch last weeks Q-T-T here and I hope you join me for when I reveal this desk with it’s new glazed pulls!

If YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, feel free to send me an email.

Enjoy your day,

Denise x

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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Keep A Perfectly Clean Edge Without Using Painters Tape!

Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Keep A Perfectly Clean Edge Without Using Painters Tape!

Posted by on Jan 13, 2015 in Blog | 8 comments

This is such a simple tip but it can provide BIG results while saving you time from masking furniture off with painters tape!

paint-perfect-edge-w-o-painters-tapeWhen I paint my furniture, I keep a perfectly clean edge without using painters tape by simply painting on a 45° degree angle.

I let my brush slide off the edge of my piece on the angle; then without reloading my brush, (and with a light touch) ,I go back over the fresh wet paint to smooth it out in the direction I want my final brush strokes.

The back of my pieces look clean and professional with a perfectly clean edge. And it saves me time from having to tape everything off.

Do you have any tips on how to keep a clean edge when painting furniture or cabinets? Chime in because I always love to hear your ideas!

You can catch last weeks Q-T-T here…. and also stay tuned for when I reveal the front side of this desk!

If YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, feel free to send me an email.

Have a wonderful day and thanks for dropping by!

Denise x

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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ A Screwy One!

Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ A Screwy One!

Posted by on Jan 6, 2015 in Blog, Furniture Repair, Product Reviews, Quick Tip Tuesday, Tools | 8 comments

Hello… so glad you’re here!

For today’s Q-T-T,  I’ll show you how I cut knob/pull machine screws to fit any type of hardware in every type of furniture… quickly and easily!

If you paint and restyle a lot of furniture, you’ve probably run into this problem…

When swapping out and changing the hardware, often the screws won’t fit correctly.  You end up with this long screw sticking out of the back side of your drawer or the knob not fitting as tightly as it should.

Here are two examples.

 

Screws too long for Hardware

 

Rather than buy and use up extra storage space for various boxes of different lengths and widths of machine screws; here’s an easy solution:

I buy a box of longer screws and use a screw cutter to cut them down to the EXACT size I need. This way I can customize the screws to whatever length I need and the inside of my drawers always look neat and professional.

 

Klein-Tool-Screw-Cutter

 

Here are the same two drawers after. The top screw on the left drawer has been cut to size and countersunk for a clean flush look. The drawer on the right shows how I slightly shortened the screw to prevent any scratching or snagging.

 

Fitted Drawer Hardware Screws

 

Screw cutters (technically I believe this tool is called an electrical wire stripper) are specifically made to cut screws without damaging the threads. To be extra sure there are no sharp ends or thread damage, after I cut, I always use a screw driver to turn the screw in a little further, and then back it out completely. This way I know the threads are in PERFECT working order!

I also really like these Truss Head Break Away Screws. I buy the 2″ in 8-32 and 10-32 which allows me to customize easily. The break away grooves make it really easy to cut with the Klein Screw Cutters.

 

Truss Head Break Away Screws

 

I’ve found the Klein Tool Cutter (I believe I paid around $30 for it) to be an EXCELLENT time saver and investment. I never worry about what size screw(s) I need for my projects. I just customize them whenever I need to!

 

cut screws for custom hardware

 

Do you have any tips for installing new hardware? Chime in because I always love hearing your ideas!

You can catch the last Q-T-T here. And if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, feel free to send me an email.

Have an amazing day!

Denise x

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