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How To Feather Glaze A French Country Bird Desk

How To Feather Glaze A French Country Bird Desk

Posted by on Apr 28, 2015 in Blog, Glazing Furniture, How To Tips, Quick Tip Tuesday | 4 comments

Hi Everyone!

Yesterday I posted a decoupaged French Country Bird Desk. The drawers were decoupaged with a gorgeous bird and floral motif, and the body was painted white and antiqued with layers of soft feather glaze.

I’ve already received a lot of questions on this finish, so it’s a perfect ‘share’ for our Quick-Tip-Tuesday!

To create this soft glaze effect, I painted the entire desk white. Then I used General Finishes Van Dyke Glaze cut with Behrs Faux Glaze. Note – I cut in the extra Behr Glaze to extend my working time because the GF dries rather quickly. I worked in small areas brushing the glaze on and then using a soft brush in a back and forth motion to smooth and soften the look.

This short video clip was intended for my sister’s eyes only so the aspect & quality isn’t the best, but it does show how to feather glaze and create a soft antiqued look.

 

 

Once the first coat was dry, I repeated the process by painting on the glaze and feathering it out again. The more layers of glaze added, the deeper and richer the finish looks. Simpy add more or less, depending on how light or dark you want to go.

Here’s the full decoupage tutorial and products used for this French Country Bird Desk – and thanks for joining me for another Q-T-T!

What glazing techniques do you like? Have you ever softened and feathered your glaze?  If you have any questions feel free to leave a comment below! As always, I love hearing from you and learn so much from your comments!  

Catch last week’s Q-T-T here – and if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, send me an email!

Enjoy your day and have fun with your next project!

Denise x

_____________________________

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How To Decoupage with Napkins

How To Decoupage with Napkins

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Blog, Decoupage, Distressing Furniture, Glazing Furniture, How To Tips, Milk Paint | 27 comments

Some of the pieces I salvage have “real-character”. Old furniture with great shape and detail, history and charm. Others pieces, well… not so much. For me, it’s always a fun challenge to transform a ‘nothing-special’ plain looking piece into something noteworthy.

This plain old desk I decoupaged with napkins is a perfect example. This desk has been restyled from seen-better-days to a ‘French Country Charmer’ – and it’s aaaah-dorable! I’ve included more close-up after pics after the how-to’s! {smile}

 

decoupage desk before & after

 

The story on this piece:

A few weeks ago I tried to decoupage a dresser. I was inspired by Shausha at Sweet Pickin’s Furniture. Sausha created a video of decoupaging furniture with floral napkins. Seriously sweet and you can see the video here!

My first attempt with my napkin decoupage didn’t turn out well. Disastrous really. After numerous tries, I ended up using tissue paper.

You can see my failed attempts here.

So, when I saw these gorgeous floral-bird napkins at The Painted Bench the other day, I was inspired to give this decoupage technique another go.

 

modpodge-napkins

 

I started by painting the perimeter of the drawers with Old Fashioned Milk Paint in Snow White, I filled in the hardware holes and completely sanded the drawers down. The Mod Podge was watered down about 15-20%, and then working with one drawer at a time, I applied a good layer to the exposed bare wood.

 

Modpodge-decoupage

 

To make sure my napkin design didn’t cover any part of the drawer I had painted, I wiped any excess Mod Podge off the sides.

 

wiping off modpodge

 

With the glue still wet (the water really helps to extend work time!), I applied 1 ply of the tissue paper on to the front of the drawer.

Here are 3 tips I’d like to share with you from my ‘near’ mistakes:

1. The key to getting this napkin decoupage technique to blend in with the wood or painted surface below is to use ONLY 1 PLY! When I was removing the top-ply of the tissue (the top-ply or sheet is the only one with the design on it) I was under the impression these were 2 ply napkins. Wrong… they were 3 ply. Luckily I noticed before I started decoupaging them on and removed the extra ply of napkin.

2. Apply your napkin motif/design right side up! This probably sounds like a silly I’d-never-make-that-mistake …right? But when I was working with all the drawers facing all different directions… well, you get the picture. Thankfully I noticed I was applying my design upside down and removed the napkin and reapplied before it had a chance to dry.

 

decoupaging drawers w napkins

 

3. Try adhering and smoothing the freshly applied napkin with plastic wrap. Another little snag I ran into was pressing the thin delicate napkin into the Mod Podge to adhere. When I tried pressing the napkin on and smoothing it out with my hand; it kept tearing.

A little bit of tearing isn’t really a big deal if you’re going to sand it down for a distressed look, but it was really tearing. My solution was to put a piece of plastic wrap on the freshly applied napkin and then smooth it out with my hand. This worked GREAT. Easy sliding so it’s effortless to press down and smooth out.

 

decoupaged drawers

 

And as an added bonus, I didn’t need to apply any more Mod Podge on the top of the napkin. The adhesive soaked right through as you can see on the plastic wrap below. And …no messy hands!

 

decoupaging drawers w paper

 

Once the napkin was adhered and fully dry, I used a sand sponge to remove the excess hanging off the drawers. Then to distress and allow the wood to show through in areas, I used my DeWalt sander with a 220 grit sand paper to lightly sand down the entire drawer front.

 

sanding decoupaged drawers

 

And here’s the finished makeover.

The body of this desk was painted with Old Fashioned Milk Paint in Snow White. To get a warm antique look, I glazed with multiple layers of General Finishes Van Dyke Brown Glaze Effects cut with Behrs Faux Finish Glaze to extend my working time. The entire piece, including the decoupaged drawers, were clear waxed with Minwax Furniture Paste for a beautiful sheen.

I truly love the way this French Country Desk all came together.

 

decoupaged desk w chair

 

decoupage-desk-w-napkins

 

decoupage bird desk&chair

 

decoupage bird desk

 

glazed&decoupaged desk

 

decoupaged drawer - close up

 

glazed desk top

 

I love salvaging furniture. I love taking an old piece that has seen better days and restyling it into something beautiful and useful. And when that revamped furniture finds a new home – seriously gratifying. {huge smile}

If you have any questions about decoupaging, feel free to ask in the comment section below! And please chime in with YOUR decoupage experience!  Have you tried using napkins? If not napkins, what have you used? As always, I’d love hear from you!  

Enjoy your day and have fun with your next project!

Denise x

_____________________________

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bird and book

 

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Painted Furniture ~ Should I Wax or Poly?

Painted Furniture ~ Should I Wax or Poly?

Posted by on Apr 21, 2015 in Blog, Product Reviews, Quick Tip Tuesday | 17 comments

Hello my friends! I’m excited to announce that today marks the 1 year anniversary of Quick-Tip-Tuesdays on the SI Blog! WOW – time flies when you’re having fun! You may have noticed I didn’t include Q-T-T in the post title. I figure we all know what Tuesdays are about around here – so from now on I’ll just get right to it. ;)

widget-break-line

One of the most common questions I get asked is “Should I wax or poly?”.

The conversations sound something like this: I’ve painted a piece of furniture and it looks amazing… now what?  How do I protect my restyled piece? What’s the most durable topcoat? Will wax hold up under heavy-duty use or extreme weather conditions?

 

Wax or Poly - Minwax for Painted Furniture

 

Here’s an email I recently received from Lisa. (Thanks so much for sharing Lisa!)

 

Denise,

I JUST came across your blog like 2 days ago and it’s great. Thanks for all you do.

I would love to paint this table and chairs, and I’ve been reading on your blog different ways to go about it.

I have 3 small boys and there is no point in buying a nice table because they will destroy it.

I have painted dressers with chalk paint before so I’m leaning towards spraying the table and chairs with that. But I feel like the wax will not give enough protection. This kitchen table will be spilled on, banged on, and sprayed and wiped with Lysol at least once a day.

Is there a top coat that will give it the protection it needs from every single day big family use? Or is this wishful thinking? Any help is MUCH appreciated.

Thanks, Lisa

 

My response:

Hi there Lisa!

This set would look amazing painted up!…very nice.

For high traffic tables and chairs I like to use a non yellowing Polycrylic or Polyurethane topcoat. Many water-based brands are easy to work with and environmentally friendly.

A few of my favorites are Varathane, Minwax and General Finishes. All of these brands come in flat, semi or gloss sheen.

Poly sealer/topcoat will ensure your high traffic furniture is protected because it cures to a super hard finish. Seals to prevent dirt, grease, scratches, stains etc. It’s also easier to clean… great for your boys. ;)

Have fun with your project and enjoy your week.

Denise

 

Don’t let this email to Lisa give you the impression that I don’t use wax. I DO! And I use A LOT of IT – on MANY  if not the majority of my chalk painted and milk painted pieces!

 

WAX or POLY FURNITURE-collage

 

But here’s MY take on using wax or poly:

With the growing popularity of chalk and milk painted furniture, wax has become a SUPER POPULAR topcoat. Why? Because both chalk and milk painted furniture is porous in nature – wax easily absorbs into the surface.

When the wax hardens, it seals the painted surface with a lovely natural looking soft sheen. The sheen can then be controlled by additional buffing. And some gorgeous effects can be created by using dark wax, white wax, or metallic wax finishes!

Having said this, my preference for HIGH TRAFFIC items such as dining sets, children’s furniture or even kitchen/bathroom cabinets is POLY.

 

Wax-or-Poly-furniture

 

I also prefer using poly products to seal latex/acrylic or enamel painted pieces because they are NOT porous is nature!

The brands I use most often are Varathane Diamond FinishMinwax Wipe-On Poly, and General Finishes High Performance Topcoat.

These polycrylics and polyurethanes cure to a super hard finish and protect against grease, dirt, and stains. Also, a poly topcoat has a more forgiving cleaning process. Once fully cured, ‘regular’ cleaning products can be used unlike waxed surfaces. For waxed pieces, a slightly damp cloth is recommended for cleaning – and depending on use, reapplication of the wax may be required a few years down the road.

 

Wax or Poly- my Fav Poly's

 

With all the different brands and various opinions on wax and poly, it can be confusing on which topcoat to use on painted furniture. To keep things simple, I use wax on chalk painted and milk painted pieces (unless they are high traffic items!)  and poly products on everything else!

If you have any questions feel free to leave a comment below! And please chime in with YOUR opinion(s) on using wax or poly? When you wax. When you poly. And why! As always, I love hearing from you and learn so much from your comments!  

Catch last week’s Q-T-T here – and if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, send me an email!

Enjoy your day and have fun with your next project!

Denise x

_____________________________

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Pinterest & Painted Furniture Inspirations

Pinterest & Painted Furniture Inspirations

Posted by on Apr 16, 2015 in Blog, Painting Furniture, Random Chit-Chat | 0 comments

Hi everyone! I hope you’re all having a great week!

Last month I created a Group Board on Pinterest – Painted Furniture IDEAS & DIY.

This community board is a great way for all of us to share restyled creations, salvaged and upcycled ideas, DIY tutorials, and pin anything furniture related we find inspiring!

Here’s just a few examples of the gorgeousness that a few contributors have pinned. I wish I could showcase them ALL – but there are well over 500 pins in the last few weeks!

 

OrphansWithMakeup-Dresser

Beautifully Embossed by Mary @ Orphans With MakeUp

 

A-Bench-For-Our-Front-Porch-Vintage-Street-Designs

Adorable Upcycled Bench by Judy @ Vintage Street Designs

 

ThePaintFactory-Vanity

Stunning Buffet by Diane @ The Paint Factory

 

Pleasant Pickins - Painted Chair

Amazing Chalk Painted Chair by Lynda @ Pleasant Pickins

 

Now I’m going to grab a hot cup of green tea and go check out what’s new on the Painted Furniture – IDEAS & DIY Board:)  A BIG thank you to all of the contributors – your pins INSPIRE!

 

Painted Furniture Ideas Pinterest Capture

 

Denise x

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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ 12 Products That Remove Ink Stains From Wood Furniture

Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ 12 Products That Remove Ink Stains From Wood Furniture

Posted by on Apr 14, 2015 in Blog, Quick Tip Tuesday | 4 comments

When you’re restyling salvaged furniture, believe me – you see your fair share of stains. When I’m painting children’s furniture, the most common stain I see is ink and permanent marker.

Even though ink stains are one of the most difficult to remove, I have to admit – I admire the little ones for testing their artistic abilities. {big smile} If it were socially acceptable for adults to doodle anytime-anywhere, I’d be pack’n a Sharpie!

 

RemoveInkStains

 

Here’s a list of 12 products to help remove ink stains from wood furniture. 

 

:: Dawn Dish Detergent

:: Baking Soda

:: Rubbing Alcohol

:: Mean Green

:: Tea Tree Oil

:: Nail Polish Remover

:: Goof Off or Goo Buster

:: Barbasol Shaving Cream

:: Toothpaste

:: Window Cleaner

:: Vinegar

:: Shout Stain Remover

 

The above products also remove ink stains from hardwood floors and wood cabinets and work on finished and/or unfinished wood.

Just keep in mind, when using ANY product, it’s a good idea to test in an inconspicuous area before going ahead with the entire piece.

 

RemoveInkStainsFromWood

 

Here’s a few other methods to keep your furniture drawers looking super clean.

Removing Stains From The Inside of Drawers

Painting The Inside of Drawers

What do you use to remove ink stains from your wood furniture? Chime in!  As always, I love hearing from you!  

Catch last week’s Q-T-T here – and if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, send me an email!

Enjoy your day and have fun with your next project!

Denise x

_____________________________

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Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Wood Fill Over Primer?

Quick-Tip-Tuesday ~ Wood Fill Over Primer?

Posted by on Apr 7, 2015 in Blog, Furniture Repair, Quick Tip Tuesday | 3 comments

Happy Tuesday to you all!

Have you ever primed or painted a piece of furniture and then noticed scratches or dings you didn’t see prior to priming? Annoying right?

Large furniture flaws are easy to spot and fix. But sometimes smaller cracks, holes or blemishes are practically invisible until you apply that first coat of primer/paint on them.

When I first started painting furniture, I was under the impression that wood fill can ONLY be used directly ON wood. Under perfect conditions – this is ideal. But we all know I’m faaaar from perfect, so there have been a few times {ok…probably more than a few ;)} when I’ve missed filling in ALL the holes or scratches prior to priming my piece(s).

So here is today’s quick-tip:

If you apply your first coat of paint/primer and then see additional scratch marks – no problem.

Re-apply your wood filler OVER the first coat of paint/primer. Wait for it to dry, and then sand as you normally do.

Then go ahead and add your second coat of primer (or just spot prime) and continue painting your project.


I’ve applied wood fill OVER primer a number of times and my finish has always turned out great!

Here’s a good example on this MCM piece I recently worked on. You can see the top has wood fill applied directly on top of the primer.

 

wood-fill-over-primer-MCM

 

The finished Mid-Century-Modern Buffet is here.

And here’s another scratched dresser top where I used this same technique. This dresser had SO MANY scratches it’s no wonder I missed a few the first time around.

 

wood-fill-over-primer-1

 

Here’s the same dresser top after it was painted.

 

wood-fill-over-primer

 

Filling in unwanted scratches, cracks and other furniture flaws is a super important step in furniture painting and restyling. It can really make or break your finish so I hope you find this tip helpful.

Have you ever noticed scratches AFTER you’ve finished filling and priming/painting? What did you do? Chime in!  As always, I love hearing from you all! x  

Catch last week’s Q-T-T here – and if YOU have any ideas or tips you would like to share on the SI Quick-Tip-Tuesday-Series, send me an email!

Enjoy your day and have fun with your next project!

Denise

_____________________________

Like what you see? Subscribe to Salvaged Inspirations so you’ll never miss a post!

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